Art Guide: Project Gallery: Diego Bianchi

Art Guide

Project Gallery: Diego Bianchi

Watch Diego Bianchi discuss his Project Gallery.

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Project Gallery: Diego Bianchi

Interested in erosion, entropy, decadence, and destruction, Diego Bianchi (b. 1969, Buenos Aires, Argentina) produced a new large-scale installation for PAMM’s project gallery adjacent to the museum’s main entrance.

Interested in erosion, entropy, decadence, and destruction, Diego Bianchi (b. 1969, Buenos Aires, Argentina) produced a new large-scale installation for PAMM’s project gallery adjacent to the museum’s main entrance.

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Floor 1 - Project: Papper Family Gallery

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Project Gallery: Diego Bianchi

Bianchi is known for his multi-part sculptural projects using found and manipulated materials, including defunct technologies or recently discarded commercial products, which reflects his interest in ideas of the unclean, the abject, and the wastefulness of contemporary commodity culture. With an underlying sense of loss and an unusual beauty, his dynamic assemblages involve binding, burning, or cementing together these worn objects, creating textured surfaces that dialogue with the work of Antoni Tàpies, concurrently on view at PAMM. He often additionally includes broken mannequins, referencing Dada experiments with violent juxtapositions of damaged forms of the early 20th century, as well as the work of postwar artists, such as Ed Kienholz or Alberto Heredia. His project for PAMM specifically engages elements that reference the cultural and material landscape of Miami.

Bianchi is known for his multi-part sculptural projects using found and manipulated materials, including defunct technologies or recently discarded commercial products, which reflects his interest in ideas of the unclean, the abject, and the wastefulness of contemporary commodity culture. With an underlying sense of loss and an unusual beauty, his dynamic assemblages involve binding, burning, or cementing together these worn objects, creating textured surfaces that dialogue with the work of Antoni Tàpies, concurrently on view at PAMM. He often additionally includes broken mannequins, referencing Dada experiments with violent juxtapositions of damaged forms of the early 20th century, as well as the work of postwar artists, such as Ed Kienholz or Alberto Heredia. His project for PAMM specifically engages elements that reference the cultural and material landscape of Miami.

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Map

3.

Floor 1 - Project: Papper Family Gallery

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